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Reviews

 

Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sonya01.html
Post by sonya01 » 09 Nov 2018, 02:57

 

Its sounds like an authoritative read. At the moment I’m trying to encourage my son to be a leader and not a follower at school, but the truth is that society needs both to function well. Any tips to be gleaned from this author would be most helpful. Thank you.


Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-t-stone.html
Post by T_stone » 09 Nov 2018, 05:11

 

There is no true leader without followers. A good book for those in posts of power and managerial positions I could learn a lot from this book. I’m definitely going to have a dig at this one. Thanks for the review.

Feeling upset sometimes may be unavoidable, but acting distressed is always optional.


Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-kandscreeley.html
Post by kandscreeley » 09 Nov 2018, 08:33

 

Most of us have to lead in some capacity or other at some point in our lives. Therefore, it’s good to be able to develop those qualities, and this sounds like the perfect book to do so. I’m glad the author uses his own experiences to drive the points home. Thanks for the review.

“There is no friend as loyal as a book.”

― Ernest Hemingway

 


Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-mtsnel006.html
Unlocking the Natural -Born Leader’s Abilities: An Autobiographical Expose by Salar A. Khan, MD, MBA
Rating: 4 out of 4 stars
Post by mtsnel00 » 05 Nov 2018, 15:26

 

 

Dr. Salar A. Khan in his book, Unlocking The Natural-Born Leader’s Abilities: An Autobiographical Expose, shares what he has learned and experienced about leadership till the age of 62 years when he wrote this autobiography. Throughout his lifetime, Khan had played many roles, including the roles of being a tutor, doctor, chief of medicine, acting director of medical services, and acting administrative officer. It was by these roles that he became interested in leadership and ended up writing this book not based on research, but based on his autobiographical lens. He challenges several assumptions revolving around leadership, such as that “leaders are not born but are made.” He asserts that everyone is born with enveloped qualities and abilities that make them natural-born leaders. In averting to start a disputation of nurture vs nature, he elaborates that inasmuch as everyone has the natural ability to lead, that ability needs to be harnessed and developed.

With this book, he focuses on fostering and unlocking the mindset of a natural leader to readers. Khan takes time to look back to his own life experiences for the readers to benefit from. He shares several occasions on how he helped other people and how that impacted on his life. He is very motivational in his books and tells the readers to be strong and not fear failure, but rather have self-confidence and strive for success. He does not say that natural-born leaders cannot fail, but that when they fail, they should fail fast so that that they can get back up again and carry on their journey. He even shares a handful of instances where he was challenged, and how he managed to be successful in the end. He sure is a great mentor and guide.

I liked that the author used his own life experiences in demonstrating how one is a natural leader. He reflected on his own life and upbringing and observed how his parent’s parenting of him contributed to him being a successful leader in the aspects of life he found himself in; be it as a son, father, husband, or a doctor. This made the notion of one being naturally born with leadership qualities more believable and relatable. I liked the most that the author provided a self-assessment tool for readers to evaluate their potential leadership and become victorious leaders in the roles they found themselves.

There is nothing I disliked about reading the book. The structure of the book was perfectly set – each chapter focused on a category of leadership qualities and how the reader could harness them. The table of content made it easy for one to navigate through to the qualities they were interested in without having to read the entire book to locate them. I immensely enjoyed reading this book, and it covered a wide range of topics I found to be interesting, such as clinical intuition and observational skills. My vocabulary greatly benefited from reading this book, and my understanding of what it means to be a leader grew profoundly.

I, therefore, rate the book 4 out of 4 stars. There were no grammatical errors found in the book, pointing to the fact that it received professional editing. The book structure made the book easy to read, and the flow of the book was smooth. I believe that the book can be relied upon in identifying and developing one’s leadership qualities since it received numerous awards, including The Pacific Book Award, meaning it can be highly recommended. I recommend the book to anyone who wants to become a successful leader and wants guidance on how to become one.

 


Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-mtsnel006.html
Post by mtsnel006 » 05 Nov 2018, 15:26
4 out of 4 stars “Unlocking the Natural -Born Leader’s Abilities: An Autobiographical Expose” by Salar A. Khan, MD, MBA

 

Dr. Salar A. Khan in his book, Unlocking The Natural-Born Leader’s Abilities: An Autobiographical Expose, shares what he has learned and experienced about leadership till the age of 62 years when he wrote this autobiography. Throughout his lifetime, Khan had played many roles, including the roles of being a tutor, doctor, chief of medicine, acting director of medical services, and acting administrative officer. It was by these roles that he became interested in leadership and ended up writing this book not based on research, but based on his autobiographical lens. He challenges several assumptions revolving around leadership, such as that “leaders are not born but are made.” He asserts that everyone is born with enveloped qualities and abilities that make them natural-born leaders. In averting to start a disputation of nurture vs nature, he elaborates that inasmuch as everyone has the natural ability to lead, that ability needs to be harnessed and developed.

With this book, he focuses on fostering and unlocking the mindset of a natural leader to readers. Khan takes time to look back to his own life experiences for the readers to benefit from. He shares several occasions on how he helped other people and how that impacted on his life. He is very motivational in his books and tells the readers to be strong and not fear failure, but rather have self-confidence and strive for success. He does not say that natural-born leaders cannot fail, but that when they fail, they should fail fast so that that they can get back up again and carry on their journey. He even shares a handful of instances where he was challenged, and how he managed to be successful in the end. He sure is a great mentor and guide.

I liked that the author used his own life experiences in demonstrating how one is a natural leader. He reflected on his own life and upbringing and observed how his parent’s parenting of him contributed to him being a successful leader in the aspects of life he found himself in; be it as a son, father, husband, or a doctor. This made the notion of one being naturally born with leadership qualities more believable and relatable. I liked the most that the author provided a self-assessment tool for readers to evaluate their potential leadership and become victorious leaders in the roles they found themselves.

There is nothing I disliked about reading the book. The structure of the book was perfectly set – each chapter focused on a category of leadership qualities and how the reader could harness them. The table of content made it easy for one to navigate through to the qualities they were interested in without having to read the entire book to locate them. I immensely enjoyed reading this book, and it covered a wide range of topics I found to be interesting, such as clinical intuition and observational skills. My vocabulary greatly benefited from reading this book, and my understanding of what it means to be a leader grew profoundly.

I, therefore, rate the book 4 out of 4 stars. There were no grammatical errors found in the book, pointing to the fact that it received professional editing. The book structure made the book easy to read, and the flow of the book was smooth. I believe that the book can be relied upon in identifying and developing one’s leadership qualities since it received numerous awards, including The Pacific Book Award, meaning it can be highly recommended. I recommend the book to anyone who wants to become a successful leader and wants guidance on how to become one.
******


KIRKUS REVIEWS

 

TITLE INFORMATION

UNLOCKING THE NATURAL-BORN LEADER’S ABILITIES
An Autobiographical Exposé
Salar A. Khan
Xlibris (124 pp.)
$22.87 hardcover, $15.99 paperback, $0.99 e-book
ISBN: 978-1-5245-9956-0; July 6, 2018

 

BOOK REVIEW

A leadership guide with an autobiographical foundation.

In his nonfiction debut, Pakistan-born physician Khan lays out his concept of “natural-born leaders”—people who are “optimistic, selfless, and do not seek external rewards or glory,” and instead seek “a sense of internal satisfaction and happiness.” According to the author, such people are “target-oriented, fully focused, self-confident, and intrinsically motivated to accomplish their tasks,” and the main goal of his book is to help his readers identify and enhance the natural-born leadership qualities inside themselves. Khan himself says that he “unlocked” his own leadership skills while working as an internist, pulmonologist, and chief of medicine in Saudi Arabia, but he says that he began the process in childhood, when he embraced responsibility and its rewards. The author takes readers through the various stages of his career in medicine, from residency to upper management, and draws lessons about self-confident leadership from a variety of trying circumstances—lessons that Khan asserts are crucial in the modern era, when the world is suffering from a “crisis when it comes to leadership.” Some of Khan’s points can seem muddled; for example, he appears to believe, as the book’s title implies, that the ability to be a natural-born leader is achievable by anyone, which seems to conflict with the idea of a “leadership crisis”; if everybody can be a natural-born leader, then the world should already be full of them. Fortunately, the quality of the other major narrative strand of Khan’s book—his personal experiences dealing with patients, fellow doctors, and supervisors over a career spanning half a century—more than compensates. Their behind-the-scenes glimpses of the medical world are consistently gripping, whether they demonstrate the “unlocking” of leadership traits or not.

Khan delivers a highly readable mixture of motivational manual and medical memoir.

 

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Title: Unlocking the Natural Born Leader’s Abilities: An Autobiographical Expose
Author: Salar A. Khan, MD., MBA.
Publisher: Xlibris
ISBN: 978-1-5245-9956-0
Pages: 128
Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
Reviewed by: Allison Walker

 

Pacific Book Review (January 2018)

It is said leaders are not born, they are made, but according to Salar Khan, MD., MBA.
some people are natural-born leaders. Everyone is born with hidden qualities to discover, some of which make people into natural leaders, Khan writes in his book, “Unlocking the Natural Born Leader’s Abilities: An Autobiographical Expose.” Leadership is a behavior, but it is also a mindset, Khan firmly believes. Until you discover how to unlock and foster that mindset, your success as a leader is limited.
“Unlocking the Natural-Born Leader’s Abilities” aims to help budding leaders discover and foster the leadership mindset. Throughout, Khan uses his own experiences to demonstrate how the leadership qualities he lists helped him succeed in his career and, most importantly, in his life. The book is primarily autobiographical. Although Khan makes an excellent effort, especially in the latter half of the book, to guide readers through the necessary qualities of a natural leader. This book is an easy read and offers great suggestions to achieve success in today’s society both on a personal level and professional level.

Khan is quite a likable and engaging narrator. He masterfully weaves his own life lessons and leadership skills in his personal story for others to benefit from. You get the distinct impression Khan truly wants to help people, and his history serving as a mentor and guide to young people supports this. In the latter half of his book, Khan’s advise for would-be leaders grows strong. He lists the qualities he found most helpful in the many
supervisory roles he served throughout his career, and properly relates stories to extrapolate on each quality. Khan takes the time to create a few helpful flowcharts and a self-assessment tool, a throwback to his time spent as a college professor. The checklist pulls together the scheme of the book, and asks readers to think critically about their own successes and failures as leaders.

Don’t be afraid of failure, Khan advises. Among the qualities of a natural-born leader are self-confidence and intrinsic motivation; natural-born leaders are driven to succeed, and by not considering failure an option, do not fear it. Instead of fearing failure, have the self-confidence to expect and strive for success, he writes. Khan’s own eventful, international life is leadership by example, and exactly the kind of guidance his reader’s need to unlock their own innate leadership qualities. If you’re ready to make a change in your life, this book is full of valuable information and resources to support you along
the way. I would highly recommend this book to professionals with a desire to leave a mark on the world, and a need of some guidance about how to do so effectively.

 


THE US REVIEW OF BOOKS (November 2017)

Unlocking the Natural-Born Leader’s Abilities: An Autobiographical Exposé
by Salar A. Khan, MD., MBA.
Xlibris
reviewed by Donna Ford

 

 

“…natural-born leaders…have an innate skill set conducive to becoming leaders. They are optimistic, selfless, and do not seek external rewards or glory.”

Illustrating the author’s own journey to leadership, this autobiography/memoir was written to pass on experience gained by a lifetime of service. A young child at the time of the India/Pakistan partition, his family resettled in Pakistan. With those early years in turmoil, his parents were his teachers. Once the author entered school, his brilliant older brother became a role model. Challenged by his family, the author assumed responsibility for household duties and volunteered for additional tasks. On his father’s advice, Khan became a doctor serving in Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and America. From experience gained, he declares it our duty to find out what we are capable of.

As if reading the short and prophetic wisdom of King Solomon, we discover the traits Khan considers significant to Natural Born Leaders (NBLs). They do not fear decision-making because they are not afraid of failure. They seek great success. They desire to motivate others because of concern for future generations. They must communicate confidently. The author defines self-confidence as informed intuition. This skill is of special value to any professional, especially a doctor.

Anecdotes in the book demonstrate how Khan’s clinical intuition grew via residency and hospital work. Frequently, he diagnosed a mysterious illness by recognizing body presentations. A hajj pilgrim was in the medical ward with the distinctive posture of tetanus but with no visible entry point of infection. It occurred to this doctor that the man might have hemorrhoids—which was the case. A decision maker, a role model, and productive person, Khan’s personal goal is always 100%. This 110-page, indexed book challenges readers to strive toward similar goals. The author also provides a self-assessment tool to help the reader determine if he/she already has, or can develop, the necessary gifts to be an NBL.

RECOMMENDED by the US Review

©2017 All Rights Reserved • The US Review of Books

This review was written by a professional book reviewer with no guarantee that it would receive a positive rating. Some authors pay a small fee to have a book reviewed, while others do not. All reviews are approximately half summary and half criticism. The US Review of Books is dedicated to providing fair and honest coverage to all books.

The Book is entered in the contest “The Eric Hoffer Award” The Eric Hoffer
Award honors the memory of the great American philosopher Eric Hoffer by highlighting salient writing, as well as the independent spirit of small publishers. Since its inception, the Hoffer has become one of the largest international book awards for small, academic, and independent presses.

 

http://www.hofferaward.com

A single category registration qualifies a book for the grand prize, press distinction, category prizes, the Montaigne Medal, the da Vinci Eye, and the First Horizon Award. The winner will be notified during May 2018.

 


BLUEINK REVIEW (June 2017)

Unlocking the Natural Born Leader’s Abilities: An Autobiographical Exposé

Salar A. Khan, MD, MBA

Xlibris, 105 pages, (paperback) $19.99, 978-1-5245-9957-7

(Reviewed: June 2017)

 

In Unlocking the Natural Born Leader’s Ability: An Autobiographical Exposé, Dr. Salar A. Khan shares wisdom he has gleaned through decades of experience as an internist and pulmonologist in three different countries: Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and the U.S. Throughout, he weaves together autobiographical elements that illuminate how he became a leader with guidance on how readers can develop their own innate leadership abilities.

Khan divides leadership abilities into two categories: convergent thinking and divergent thinking. “Convergent-thinking leaders,” he writes, “have a limited predetermined number of options and will look for data that supports one or the other.” Because of this, they miss choices that could, in fact, be superior to those being considered. Divergent thinkers have a greater capacity, notes Khan, to “deal with stressful situations honestly, confidently, and intuitively and are creative, knowledgeable, charismatic and sociable.”

Khan stresses the importance of developing your intuition, insightfulness and self-confidence and includes the following as key leadership characteristics: integrity, the ability to communicate effectively, sacrifice, patience and composure, open-mindedness, courage, compassion, and optimism. He believes that the pursuit of internal happiness is better than the pursuit of money.

Khan writes in an engaging style, and anecdotes of his own journey prove compelling. He reveals how six of the 11 children in his birth family died between the ages of two and four because of “global health issues.” Stories of his upbringing in Pakistan, meanwhile, show intriguing ways that supportive parents can positively shape their children’s future. Khan also shares detailed anecdotes from his medical work that illustrate how he developed his own natural born leadership tendencies.

Also, available in hardcover and eBook.


READERS MAGANET (May 2017)

ReadersMagnet Book Fairs Evaluation BOOK RECOMMENDATION Unlocking the Natural-Born Leader’s Abilities Genre: Self Help, Author: Dr. Salar Khan Book Description: 124 pages, ISBN: 1524599573 / 978-1524599577 Publisher: XLIBRIS, Date of Publication: March 24, 2017 Genre Specific and Marketability

    1. What are the book’s strong points that make the book stand-out among other books in its specific genre? The book has essentially relatable possibilities to all audiences and not necessarily specific to a certain group/market/interest. This is a brave attempt to share perspectives in a form of fiction rather than the cliché of stating general occurrences. A highly readable book that deserves a wide range audience. This book was written as if the author had years of practice in making the implausible plausible since this is a superbly realized portrayal of the possible future.
    2. What would most likely contribute to the book’s success? At this point, the book is not known to the general audience and it needs consistent marketing and exposure through the help of decision makers and their connections.

 

Comments on Book (May 2017): My Previous Boss.

Michael Anaya Chief Operating Officer/Executive Vice President-Curatio Solutions – Fort Worth TX – USN/USAF Veteran

Dr. Khan… congratulations … Incredible work and as always, my warmest wishes to you and your family. This accomplishment is another defining moment on your journey to assist others in tapping into their potential … Chiseling and further defining how you lead through an awareness of your natural abilities is an active and constant process… Thank you for sharing!!!! Best, Michael

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AM I BURNED OUT AT WORK?
A Self-Care Solution
Salar A. Khan
Archway Publishing (204 pp.)
$26.95 hardcover, $12.95 paperback, $0.99 e-book
ISBN: 978-1-4808-8332-1; October 14, 2019

 

BOOK REVIEW

A physician offers a prescription for overcoming burnout.

According to Khan (Unlocking the Natural-Born Leader’s Abilities, 2017), “workplace burnout is becoming a national epidemic” and it has not yet been identified as “purely a medical or psychiatric illness.” The author’s antidote is a “self-care solution”; he offers intelligent, if at times repetitive, advice to diagnose and treat burnout. Khan begins with lyrics to a “Burnout Awareness Song” as well as “Burnout Self-Care Poetry,” both of which seem a bit odd yet they immediately put the problem on a personal level. Of greater significance is the material concerning self-assessment in the first chapter; in addition to addressing how personality plays a role in the condition, the author includes a scoring tool that helps readers determine their burnout levels. Khan then presents some research regarding the condition, followed by a discussion of workplace burnout. One of the more engaging and perhaps strongest aspects of the book is how the author relates burnout to the medical profession. He provides useful advice for primary care doctors about the diagnosis of burnout (again using a scoring tool), but he also adds a very personal element to the book by discussing his own professional experience with the condition. During his career as an attending physician and pulmonologist, Khan was under tremendous pressure as his responsibilities dramatically increased; he had “to learn how I did all that extra hard work with excellence without severe burnout.” His keen insights and observations of himself and others lend a particularly powerful element to this manual. Later, the author identifies what he believes are “eighteen phases of burnout,” describing each one and adding his recommendations for dealing with it—instructive, if somewhat overwhelming. It is the “Step-by-Step Self-Care Solution” that is likely to be the most pertinent portion of the volume. Here Khan gently but firmly walks readers through a series of steps to avoid burnout and treat it. He also talks about how to prevent future burnout and offers some helpful ways to reduce workplace stress in order to minimize the condition.

A lucid guide to burnout, with valuable content for employees, employers, and medical professionals.


Review: Shaping the Future of Global Leadership by Salar A. Khan, MD, MBA

A well-traveled medical practitioner and executive has created a manual with global conscience for recognizing, training and electing trustworthy, admirable world leaders in Shaping the Future of Global Leadership: Finding a Peaceful Solution.

Author Khan states at the outset that he has religious beliefs but doesn’t wish to “disturb or distract” those with or without such beliefs who read his guide, but it does provide some basis for his treatise, suggesting God can also be referred to as a universal organizing principle (UOP). He asserts that among all great world religions are overarching principles for how we must live and treat one another to survive, and those principles come into play in the selection of reliable leaders, and how the world can move forward peacefully.

Khan has organized his credo in logical order: observations about the earth and the universe indicating a pattern to life, the inculcation of our leaders to best practices for global survival, the development of individual leaders from an early age, the initiation of a worldwide strategy to ensure that future leaders are people we would choose, rather than those who have risen to or seized power out of personal ambition or greed. It’s a decidedly far-reaching focus in a field that normally focuses narrowly on leadership in business.

Natural-born leaders (NBLs) are those who make decisions based on best available data, in a morally sound way, and hold themselves accountable for problems and failures. Khan’s plan for improved global leadership involves creating Independent Global Leadership Organizations (IGLO) to locate, analyze, educate and certify potential candidates who can then stand for election. The tenets of the IGLO would be accepted by all nations, and funded by all. He envisions such a template could be in place as early as 2024.

Khan states that we can see earthly order through geology, biology, and genetics, and learn from that. Taking an analogy from the Koran, he compares the delicate web of the spider to the protection that we seek to create for our families and ourselves. These complex webs can be easily destroyed; we are obligated as thinking beings to build as strong a web as we can for our loved ones, and we will reap the consequences of our poor choices. Here he’s less persuasive than he is when offering more nuts-and-bolts prescriptions for global dynamics, as these more abstract ideas are interesting, but less actionable.

Though much of this current book is given over to theory, one senses that there may be a more complete manual to follow, placing less stress on religious underpinning with regard to leadership development, and more on pragmatic step-by-step guidelines, which are covered here only in the final pages. He does offer a pragmatic self-assessment for competence for leadership self-evaluation, including statements such as “I am not afraid to make changes to the status quo,” and “I am serious and sincere in my decision-making,” but some of this may be a bit basic for those on the global stage.

That said, the effect of the book is cumulative, so when everything is taken together, it’s a persuasive and original take on leadership that can be used on both small and large scales. Khan, a much awarded and recognized professional, has personal experience of rising to a leadership role, and that shows in the book’s methodical presentation. Thoroughly optimistic and thought-provoking, the book will attract readers who share the author’s vision of a world of united nations whose leaders are worthy of their chosen roles.

 


SHAPING THE FUTURE OF GLOBAL LEADERSHIP
Finding a Peaceful Solution
Salar A. Khan
Archway Publishing (126 pp.)
$25.95 hardcover, $11.99 paperback, $2.99 e-book
ISBN: 978-1-4808-9366-5
August 28, 2020

 

BOOK REVIEW

A physician and researcher focuses on the need and means to create global leaders of moral integrity in this ambitious book.

According to Khan, the world is spiraling into poverty and war and the principal culprit is a failure of global leadership. The crux of this problem is moral in character—without the direction provided by “transcendent principles,” leaders are inclined to “selfishness, cruelty, egoism, and hysteria.” The moral order of the cosmos is guaranteed by a “universal organizing principle,” which one can, as the author does, refer to as God. Khan proposes that moral integrity could be spread through a program that identifies potential leaders in their youth and subjects them to a training regimen. This would require the establishment of a kind of global accreditation agency to compose the standards and oversee their implementation, an Independent Global Leadership Organization. Khan’s discussion is characteristically vague—he doesn’t provide a lot of actionable details regarding the nature of the selection of leaders or their training. In addition, he doesn’t examine the challenges of any test for leadership being globally accepted or enforced given thorny issues like political diversity and sovereignty. Even his understanding of a leader’s essential characteristics is unhelpfully broad—patience, open-mindedness, and compassion are inarguably good traits, but surely leadership requires much more than these attributes. The author is admirably open about his own religious commitments—he’s a practicing Muslim—and tries to articulate a message that could be generally palatable to theists of all stripes. Moreover, he writes in consistently clear prose unencumbered by technical jargon. But his suggestions are not only indeterminate, but also a bit naïve—the creation of moral leaders is not a simple matter of technocratic training. Ultimately, this is a peculiarly apolitical book given that the author’s mission is to improve the messy political world.

A lucid but overly general discussion of leadership that lacks practical details.